A photo gallery of the construction process is presented below.


The figures in the following scenes are accurate at 1/77th scale. The beams correspond to timbers of 29 inches by 29 inches, with the largest single beam being 90 feet long.
07/04/2000

This end view emphasizes the six-to-one ratio of length over width.


07/04/2000

Here we see one of the sloped ends of the Ark. This shape would help to deflect the initial impact of a large tidal wave.


07/04/2000

These pyramid shaped cells would provide the greatest possible structural support for a ship of this size.


07/05/2000

The angles of this model correspond to those of the Great Pyramid of Egypt.


07/05/2000

As more of the beams are put into place, the shape of the Ark becomes more apparent.


07/06/2000

This end view shows the second level stretching into the distance the length of almost two football fields.



With this series of pictures we see the support beams for the three different levels and additional ribs for the outer walls.

07/06/2000

07/06/2000

07/07/2000

Here the superstructure is nearly complete. The Ark was designed to withstand the initial impact of a huge tidal wave, and afterwards to rise to the surface of the waters and float. It also needed to hold an immense cargo. There was no motive power or steering required. Speed of movement was also not a factor. For all these reason we believe the flat-bottomed boat concept is the best choice. The triangular and pyramid shapes would afford the greatest structural strength as well.


The flooring is especially thick to allow for longer spans between support beams. It would have been easier for Noah and his sons to machine fewer large beams than to produce a much larger quantity of smaller ones.
07/08/2000

07/08/2000

07/08/2000

07/08/2000

07/15/2000

Looking straight down the long corridor of the second level, this dramatic view shows the immense storage capacity of this portion of the Ark.


07/15/2000

With the lower levels visible in the foreground, this view shows a small part of the 16,000 plus square feet of floor space on the top level.


07/20/2000

Preparation of the bottom floor is progressing well. The outer skin is formed by two alternating layers of thick wooden planks with pitch on the outside and between the layers. The innermost layer (more visible in subsequent pictures) is bare wood. The slightly elevated walkway runs the full length of the Ark. This is wide enough to support large wheeled carts used to transport cargo to its respective bins. Cargo is loaded on each level before the outer skin is applied to the walls. The lowest level, containing goods of a nonperishable and durable nature, could be loaded years in advance of the actual voyage.


07/20/2000

This aerial view shows the support beams in the floor which also form a sort of framework to hold cargo firmly in place during voyage. Specially constructed containers interlock with these beams and one another, and are stackable to the full height of the ceiling. As noted before, this innermost layer is of bare wood, for practical reasons. See the previous picture for an explanation of the outer skin.


07/20/2000

The walkway is nearly five feet wide between the support beams on either side which also strengthen the floor of the ark, and keep carts from going off the side.


07/22/2000

This picture, and several that follow, are of the ramps connecting the bottom and middle levels.


07/22/2000

This view shows the platform midway between the first two floors which connects the two ramps.


07/22/2000

The small beams which form the surface of the ramps have dimensions that correspond to roughly 5 inches by 5 inches.


07/22/2000

The slope of these ramps is gentle enough for walking, but the use of the large wheeled carts would require some form of assistance, such as a rope and pulley system.


07/25/2000

Access between floors during the voyage may have been via ramps such as those pictured here and in the next several pictures. This is the lower portion of the ramp connecting the middle and top floors of the Ark.


07/25/2000

This view is from the base of the ramp at the middle level.


07/25/2000

Here is a view of the underside of the ramp at the middle level showing some of the support beams.


07/25/2000

Another view from the base of the ramp at the middle level.


07/25/2000

A view from the top floor, looking down the ramp to the middle level.


08/07/2000

The next six pictures show one of the four holding tanks that are in each of the four corners of the Ark. Two of the tanks, diagonally opposite from one another, will contain drinking water. These tanks will also have a baffle system to keep the water from sloshing during rough weather.


08/07/2000

This top view shows the huge capacity of this tank (over 74,000 gallons). The interior walls and floor will be coated with resinous pitch to make a water-tight compartment.


08/08/2000

Here is a view from the bottom of the tank looking up.


08/07/2000

All four tanks are of the same size and shape. The other two will be used for waste material that accumulates during the voyage. Easy access will be available to these tanks for pushing material over the edge of the upper two floors into the tank below.


08/07/2000

Inspection of this tank is nearly complete. The next step will be to apply the water-proofing compound to the interior.


08/08/2000

A final view from near the bottom of the tank.


10/30/2000

Additional beams are being installed between the ribs of the frame. These will provide additional support for the outer skin.


10/30/2000

Construction of the outer skin is a long process.


10/30/2000

Here is an inside view of a small section of the outer skin.


10/30/2000

This section now begins to take on the appearance of a large room. The top floor is shown here. Lower floors have even larger capacity.


10/31/2000

This is the first of three frames showing the outer skin taking shape. This shows two of the holding tanks and support structures.


10/31/2000

Second of three frames showing the outer skin taking shape.


10/31/2000

Third of three frames showing the outer skin taking shape.


10/31/2000

This is the first of six frames showing the interior of the Ark with the outer skin in place on one side. The objects, which are to scale, help to demonstrate the relative size of the rooms, ceiling height, etc.


10/31/2000

The large overhead beam in the background is halfway between the floor and the ceiling, yet the person standing has no trouble fitting underneath.


10/31/2000

This view from a distance shows more clearly the immense size of each section.


10/31/2000

As mentioned previously, the capacity of the lower floors is progressively larger.


10/31/2000

Here all three floors are visible, showing more clearly their relative capacity.


10/31/2000

This final picture in the sequence shows the inner framework of beams, including the long diagonal support beams.